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New Zealand Ocean Acidification Community


Working together to understand the changing ocean

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New Zealand Ocean Acidification Community


Working together to understand the changing ocean

 

Our Mission

Ocean acidification is the term for one of the effects of rising carbon dioxide levels - changes in the chemistry of the seawater.

Scientists across New Zealand are studying these changes at many levels and in many ways.

Delve into our site to find out more.

 

 
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A community story


How the NZOAC was formed

A community story


How the NZOAC was formed

New Zealand scientists began, in 2006, to assess the chemical and biological effects of Ocean Acidification (OA) in the New Zealand context. Early on, we realised that seawater carbonate chemists and marine biologists need to work together with government agencies and stakeholders and marine farmers, if we are to understand how OA might impact our coastal and open oceans.

Originally, we were a group of scientists from the University of Otago (Departments of Botany, Chemistry and Marine Science) and the National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research Ltd (NIWA). Today, we collaborate with researchers, government scientists, policy-makers, marine farmers and aquaculture operators across New Zealand and overseas.

NZOAC supports OA research across New Zealand. We host an annual national workshop for OA workers across New Zealand (and increasingly from overseas), sponsor international speakers and assist students to attend.  


Most of all, we're a community working together to understand the changing ocean.

 

 
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Meet the Council


Meet the Council


Christina McGraw

NZOAC CHAIR, U OTAGO

Christina McGraw is a marine analytical chemist. Her research revolves around the design of field-deployable instrumentation for marine research. Current projects include deployable devices to study short-term variability and automated culture systems to study the impact of global climate change on marine ecosystems.

CLIFF LAW

NIWA

Dr Cliff Law coordinates Ocean-Atmosphere Research and currently contributes to national and international policy development on ocean fertilisation and acidification.  His current research interests include trace gas cycling and sources in coastal and open ocean regions, nutrient limitation of phytoplankton and impacts of ocean acidification. 

helen bostock

NIWA

Dr Helen Bostock is a marine geologist interested in understanding past changes in the Southern Ocean. She is particularly interested in ocean acidification, sediments and sedimentation processes. Helen produces the newsletter for the NZOAC.

 

NiKKI haweS

SPATNZ / CAWTHRON

Nikki is the Industry representative on the council and is based in Nelson. She works for SPATNZ (Shellfish Production and Technology, New Zealand Limited), where her work involves selective breeding of GreenshellTM mussels, including looking at developing mussel families that are resistant to the effects of ocean acidification, in conjunction with the Cawthron Institute. Nikki was involved in the build of the world’s first fit-for-purpose GreenshellTM mussel breeding hatchery, which opened in April 2015. Nikki is also working towards a PhD with the University of Auckland and the Cawthron Institute researching the trans-generational epigenetic mechanisms associated with rapid adaptation to environmental stress, including climate change. 

 

Conrad pliditch

U WAIKATO

Conrad is Professor of Biological Sciences at the University of Waikato. His area of speciality is benthic oceanography/ecology focusing on the processes that influence the structure and function of soft-sediment communities. Together with colleagues and students, research has been conducted in a wide range of environments ranging from the inter-tidal to the deep sea, a reflection of the extensive occurrence of soft-sediment habitats.

mary sewell

U AUCKLAND

Assoc. Prof. Mary A. Sewell is a marine biologist at the University of Auckland working on the effects of ocean acidification on kina, paua and green-shell mussels using whole-organism, physiological and - omics approaches.  Research takes place in both temperate (Hauraki Gulf, Firth of Thames) and polar environments (Antarctica).

 

 

Linn hofmann

U OTAGO

Dr Linn Hofmann is a Lecturer in Botany at the University of Otago. Her work focusses on the effect of different environmental stressors for marine phytoplankton physiology and ecology. She is mainly interested in the effect of climate change related stressors such as ocean acidification and ocean warming and the effect of trace metals e.g. from volcanic eruptions on marine phytoplankton and the implications for higher trophic levels of the food chain. Current research includes asking how does ocean acidification affect trace metal bioavailability and what are the implications thereof for marine phytoplankton?

norman ragg

CAWTHRON INSTITUTE

Norman leads the physiology team at Cawthron, drawing on a background of work in the aquaculture industry combined with training as a classical biologist focusing on physiology. This is brought to bear in a range of projects where the physiology of aquaculture species is a key issue, including work on ocean acidification. 

Victoria metcalf

OPMCSA / U AUCKLAND

Dr Victoria Metcalf is a marine biologist, geneticist and science communicator. She has made seven trips to the Antarctic and has been researching Antarctic fish and invertebrates since 1998 as well as aquaculture species. She is learning more about how key species have adapted to their environment and the potential impacts of warming temperatures, ocean acidification and pollution. She is passionate about engaging the public with science and has a role in the Office of the Prime Minister’s Chief Science Advisor as National Coordinator of the Participatory Science Platform.  

 

 

Ro allen

U OTAGO

Ro is a PhD student at the University of Otago, supervised by Linn Hofmann. His PhD is on the "Effect of ocean acidification and warming on natural Southern Ocean phytoplankton communities".

Anna Kluibenschedl

U OTAGO

Anna is a PhD student at the University of Otago. Her PhD under Miles Lamare, Chris Hepburn and Wendy Nelson (UA) is "Future Ocean and New Zealand Coralline Algae: Biological and Ecological Responses Under Elevated pCO2"